Licht-im-Terrarium: Literaturdatenbank

WIKINDX Resources

Gasparro, F. P. & Brown, D. B. (2000) Photobiology 102: UV Sources and Dosimetry – the Proper Use and Measurement of ''Photons as a Reagent''. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 114 613–615. 
Resource type: Journal Article
BibTeX citation key: Gasparro2000
View all bibliographic details
Categories: Englisch = English
Keywords: Lampen = Lamps, Photometrie = Photometry, Ultraviolett = Ultraviolet
Creators: Brown, Gasparro
Collection: Journal of Investigative Dermatology
Abstract
The goal of these comments is 3-fold: (i) to prevent the propagation of serious experimental errors in photobiology; (ii) to improve the quality and relevance of photobiology experiments; and (iii) to save authors, reviewers and editors time. Recently several manuscripts have been received in which the title describes the use of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) to induce some effect. It is not uncommon for the description of the UVR to be limited to one or two sentences. Often the sources are described all together incorrectly. This is inexcusable for any submission, and it is an especially egregious flaw in a manuscript in which UVR is the principal reagent! The most common examples involve studies in which ''sunlamps'' are employed. These lamps are often described as a source of UVB. Some authors give a peak wavelength, e.g., 300 or 313 nm or some variation of these. Some provide the percent of UVB and UVA (almost always omitting any mention of UVC). This is at a minimum inaccurate and probably just plain wrong. The most common sunlamps are broad spectrum sources that emit radiation starting in the UVC near 270 nm and ending in the UVA near 360 nm (see Figure 1). The percentages of wavelengths in the UVA, UVB, and UVC regions are 43%, 54%, and 3%, respectively (Brown et al. submitted).
  
wikindx 5.3.2 ©2018 | Total resources: 1050 | Username: -- | Bibliography: WIKINDX Master Bibliography | Style: Associação Brasileira de Normas Técnicas (ABNT) | Database queries: 43 | DB execution: 0.04537 secs | Script execution: 0.10922 secs